March: Book One

March Book One Congressman John Lewis GA is an American icon one of the key figures of the civil rights movement His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper s farm to the

  • Title: March: Book One
  • Author: John Lewis Andrew Aydin Nate Powell
  • ISBN: 9781603093002
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Paperback
  • Congressman John Lewis GA 5 is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper s farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from theCongressman John Lewis GA 5 is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper s farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African American president.Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best selling artist Nate Powell winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole.March is a vivid first hand account of John Lewis lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation Rooted in Lewis personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.Book One spans John Lewis youth in rural Alabama, his life changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall.Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1950s comic book Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations March Book One of Three , a 128 page softcover with french flaps, 6.5 x 9.5

    • March: Book One : John Lewis Andrew Aydin Nate Powell
      212 John Lewis Andrew Aydin Nate Powell
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      Published :2019-06-11T22:48:22+00:00

    About “John Lewis Andrew Aydin Nate Powell

    • John Lewis Andrew Aydin Nate Powell

      John Robert Lewis is the U.S Representative for Georgia s 5th congressional district, serving since 1987 and is the dean of the Georgia congressional delegation He was a leader in the American Civil Rights Movement and chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee SNCC , playing a key role in the struggle to end segregation He is a member of the Democratic Party and is one of the most liberal legislators.

    336 thoughts on “March: Book One

    • This first volume of the graphically realized three-part autobiography of civil rights stalwart John Lewis covers the congressman’s life from his days as a poor farm boy dreaming of becoming a preacher to his work as an organizer of the 1960 lunch counter sit-ins in Nashville and the founding of the Students’ Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. As it it shifts from its frame story—a gathering of Lewis with friends and constituents minutes before Obama’s first inauguration—to the tales [...]


    • I just finished March Book 3, and I felt I couldn't quite write a fitting review until I had completed the series. This is my third foray into the world of the graphic novel, and judging by the books I have read (Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi and Maus by Art Spiegelman), it is a genre worthy of much more exploration. March Books 1-3 are different from anything I have ever read about civil rights, racism and the politics of this country. These books made me feel included in the struggle, that I w [...]


    • "My dear children, read. Read everything."I've seen this graphic novel around on a few times and was super intrigued by it. It didn't let me down. On the contrary, it moved me to tears and gave me goosebumps. The novel tells the story of John Lewis, his life and his fight in the civil rights movement around the 1950's and 60's. Seeing how the world is going up in flames, it's significant to recall that resistance, that fighting for your rights, that demanding truth and fairness through protests [...]



    • Video full series review (spoiler free)- youtu/qcfjel-dHy0Just amazing. A very emotional read for me since this volume was set in my city. I know these places and this history, but seeing and hearing it in Lewis's own words is priceless. The Nashville library is currently doing a big promotion of this trilogy, so I have quite a long wait for volumes 2 and 3 but will be continuing as soon as I can.


    • This has been on my TBR for so long, I still can’t believe I have it in my hands. March: Book One is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.I had such high expectations build up in my head, and I can now say that this book was truly every [...]


    • An extraordinary memoir in the graphic novel format which gives the reader a keen cognizance on the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. ‘March: Book One’, the first book of a trilogy, is a riveting tale of the civil rights era told from the perspective of U.S. Congressmen John Lewis. Written by Lewis and his colleague, Andrew Aydin, the crisp black and white fluid stroke illustrations of this book is done by Nate Powell.This autobiographical graphic novel presents the reader with an emotional visual [...]


    • This is a powerful look at Congressman John Lewis' role in the Civil Rights Movement. This first book in the March trilogy focuses on Lewis' childhood in Alabama, his interest in becoming a preacher, how he met Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and the lunch counter sit-ins in Nashville. The story is framed by Barack Obama's presidential inauguration in January 2009, with Lewis telling his story to some visitors in his congressional office. This is a wonderful and moving graphic novel, and I'm eager to [...]


    • MARCH Sweeps American Library Association Awards with Record-Breaking FOUR Wins January 23, 2017One small quibble (don't you just love the word quibble) on the format: some of the speech in the bubbles was too small to read. As for the content, WOW, how magnificent these passive resisters were to the ugliness of racial prejudice. If you have seen/read Hidden Figures then you will know that this, March bk 1, runs parallel with its referencing to the counter closed scenario.And I finished this on [...]


    • An educational and inspirational story of the Civil Rights movement in the sixties from the perspective of one who was there and active in it, Senator John Lewis, who met and worked with and marched on Washington, D. C. in 1963 with Martin Luther King. Amazingly, more than fifty years later, Sen. Lewis just recently led a sit-down strike on the Senate floor demanding action on gun violence post-Orlando.In the first of three volumes, we get background on Senator Lewis, a condensed story, but it's [...]


    • I was stopped in my tracks at the Nerd-vana known as the San Diego Comic Convention when I noticed a man handing out short, yellowed copies of a fifty-plus-year-old comic book emblazoned with the face of Martin Luther King Jr. I had to stop. I struck up a conversation with Nate Powell, the graphic artist behind March, Book One, a graphic memoir of Congressman John Lewis. Lewis was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and speaker six at the March on Washington, celeb [...]



    • This is an autobiography of US Congressman John Lewis who was a leader of the Civil Rights movement and one of the key figures in the struggle to end segregation. In this book we see his life starting from humble beginning at an Alabama farm to just before 1963 March on Washington.This is the first time I read an autobiography in a graphic novel format. In this particular instance it worked. I have to admit I am not very familiar with US history of that period. The only two names of the people m [...]


    • Fantastic GN - so glad to see this medium finally reaching the potential it has as an educational medium. The story of John Lewis is a story embedded in the best of what America has always aspired to be - and that aspiration is needed (now more than ever) if we hope to march forward towards a peaceful future.



    • From the publisher summary:"March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.Book One spans John Lewis’ youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their ba [...]



    • The third book in the graphic novel series March won the National Book Award for Young People's Literature in 2016, prompting me to have a look at the series. Book 1 depicts John Lewis’ childhood in rural Alabama, where he grew up on a farm. His personality was revealed early, and his relatives took to calling him “preacher.” He cared more about words and concepts than the back-breaking reality of labor in the fields. He liked to wear a tie and read books any day and escaped to school even [...]



    • I had the pleasure of reading this graphic novel which is dedicated to the life and Civil Rights work of Congressman John Lewis. The novel sheds light and understanding on Lewis' entry into the movement as well as some aspects of the Civil Rights movement that are maybe ignored, Obviously, this graphic novel could be used as a teaching tool but it is more than that it recognises a man who was an essential part of the movement. It honours all of those black and white activists that paved the way [...]


    • this is what graphic history is for: read it. remember. care. hope read the trilogy review here: /review/show


    • "Ma'am, may we be served?"Imagine walking into a restaurant and sitting at the bar. They won't serve you. It's not that you're too young, too drunk, or too invisible. You're just black. Then they ask you to leave because you're black. Rather shocking and unimaginable, if I do say so myself. Somehow I never knew about John Lewis or these lunch counter sit-ins. I can't say I'm surprised this history lesson eluded me throughout my unsatisfactory public education. It's not the most violent series of [...]


    • I can tell that all the books in this series will be phenomenal, but this one ended a bit abruptly to me. But it's very powerful nonetheless. I'm reading Book Two now and it's already apparent that Book Three was a very worthy recipient of the National Book Award.


    • Trigger warnings: racism.I've been wanting to read this graphic novels for ages now, but graphic novels are painfully expensive for something that takes me less than half an hour to read, so I could never quite bring myself to spend money on it. Conveniently, my local library brought all three volumes recently, so HELLO IT IS READING TIME. Let's start with the fact that I started crying on the first freaking page solely because this book starts on on Obama's inauguration day in 2009. From there, [...]


    • Okay, so I cried while reading this book. Not because of the injustices of the past, let’s face it, they were horrible. But because of my own inadequacies. I don’t think I would have been able to do what needed to be done. I don’t think I would have been able to fight the good fight. The demonstrators went through tortureHELL. I can’t imagine their sacrifice and I can’t imagine myself ever doing something like that. So I give a huge dose of respect to John Lewis, his family, Jim Lawson [...]


    • I have only one complaint about this book. It is the first of three volumes and I can't wait until the next two are released.John Lewis is one of the great men of my lifetime. If every student in America used his books and story for their February African-American History Month reports, this would be a better country. Lewis was a courageous, non-violent advocate for civil rights. He is the only speaker from the 1963 March on Washington still alive. He, more than the Rev. Jesse Jackson, is the he [...]


    • This is a beautifully drawn and important graphic novel about the civil rights movement, especially the fundamentals of nonviolent protest. It doesn't take long to read, but inspires every step of the way!


    • As a white woman raised in close-enough-to-comfort in the eighties, my voice is probably not necessary for praising this book, but it definitely deserves every ounce of praise.


    • John Lewis has lived a truly remarkable life. Reading his memoir, I was astounded at his courage and conviction. And this is just the first volume of three! Even a poorly written, badly illustrated book of his life could be fascinating, and this is wonderfully scripted and illustrated. It was an interesting choice to start the book with Lewis's childhood chickens, but it was the sort of detail that made him feel more like a real person and less like a character in a book. I'm very much looking f [...]


    • What powerful first volume! I think the graphic novel genre is a really interesting way to write a memoir- in some ways it feels even more personal while also being very accessible. I got a lot out of this first part of the story & certainly learned some new things along the way. It makes me happy to know that children are reading this, but adults really should be reading it, too. We all need a reminder of our not-too-past history.


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